Spanish Translation  //  Traductor inglÚs-espa˝ol  //  Traduction franšais-espagnol

Syndicate this blog XML

What is RSS?
AddThis Social Bookmark Button
AddThis Social Bookmark Button

07/26/07

Permalink 10:09:46 am, Categories: About JB Translations, 286 words  

Spanish phrases and words #8

From Chris Royston, weekly collaborator here at Into Spanish Translation Blog:

Here are some animal related idioms:

- "Correr como un galgo" means "To run like a greyhound". In English a fast runner runs like a rabbit, a hare or a gazelle.
- "Dar a alguien gato por liebre" literally translates to "To give someone a cat for a hare". North Americans have to remember that Europeans eat rabbits. The equivalent in English is "To pull the wool over someone's eyes".
- "A otro perro con ese hueso" translates literally as "To another dog with that bone". In English we might say "Go tell it to the Marines".

Thanks Chris! There are indeed many animal-related idioms. Dogs seem to be particularly active on this front:

- “Tiene un humor de perros” —literally, “He’s in a dog mood”— may be translated as "He’s in a foul mood".
- “Es el mismo perro con otro collar” —literally, “It’s the same dog with a different collar”— could be translated as “It’s the same thing under a different name”.
- “Es perro viejo” —literally, it’s an old dog— may be translated as “It’s a wily old bird”.

Now a few ones with cats:

- “Aquí hay gato encerrado” —“There’s a cat locked up here”— can be translated as “There’s something fishy going on here”.
- “Son cuatro gatos” —“They’re four cats”— can be translated as “They’re only a handful of people”.
- “Llevarse el gato al agua” —“To bring the cat to the water”— can be translated as “To pull it off”.
- “Eso lo sabe hasta el gato” —“Even the cat knows that”— can be translated as “Everybody knows that”.
Want more? Don't hesitate to visit Colloquial Spanish blog!

Permalink

07/21/07

Spanish phrases and words #7

From Chris Royston, weekly collaborator here at Into Spanish Translation Blog:

Here are some (not an exhaustive list) idioms involving hunger, "hambre" in Spanish:

"A buen hambre no hay pan duro" translates to "For a good hunger there's no such thing as hard bread". In English we might say "Hunger is the best sauce". Henry Fielding, the author of "Tom Jones" phrased it as "Hunger is better than a French chef".

"Tengo un hambre canina" literally means "I have a canine hunger". When we're this hungry in English we say "I'm so hungry I could eat a horse".

"Ser más listo que el hambre" literally translates to "To be more clever (smarter) than hunger". The equivalent in English is "To be as sharp as a tack".

Thanks Chris! I would just one more:

"Se juntaron el hambre y las ganas de comer", meaning "hunger and crave for food met", may be translated as "They're two of a kind".

Want more? Don't hesitate to visit Colloquial Spanish blog!

Permalink

07/12/07

Spanish phrases and words #6

From Chris Royston, weekly collaborator here at Into Spanish Translation Blog:

Here are some somewhat lugubrious idioms. In English, when someone is gravely ill we say "he's at death's door" or "He's got one foot in the grave". Here are some Spanish equivalents:

- "Está en las últimas" which translates to "He's in the last throes"
- "Está en los umbrales de la muerte" meaning "He's in the thresholds of death"
- "Está a dos pasos de la muerte" signifies "He's two steps away from death"
- "Tiene un pie en la hoya (huesa)" translates to "He has one foot in the grave"

Thanks Chris! I would add a few more idioms related to death:

- "Tiene los días contados" is "His days are numbered"
- "Te quedan dos telediarios" (humourous, ofen used when hearing a relative or friend coughing like mad) means "Only two news programs left for you"
- "Está de muerte" (referring to some delicious food) literally means "It's deadly good" and could be translated as "It's finger-licking good"
- "Me dio un susto de muerte" is "He scared me to death"
- "Un pueblo de mala muerte" literally means "a village of bad death" and may be translated as a dump or a hole
- There's also "Un hotel de mala muerte", literally meaning "a hotel of bad death", and it may be translated as "A grotty hotel".

Want more? Don't hesitate to visit Colloquial Spanish blog!

Permalink

07/03/07

Spanish phrases and words #5

From Chris Royston, weekly collaborator here at Into Spanish Translation Blog:

Here are some idioms involving gallina (hen) or gallo (rooster):

- "Gallina ciega" literally translates to "blind hen". In English we know this game as "Blind man's bluff".

- "Acostarse con las gallinas" has the shocking literal translation of "To go to sleep with the hens", but the idiomatic meaning is far more pedestrian: "To go to bed early".

Yes Chris, the literal translation indeed distorts the idiomatic meaning of this saying. "Con" can most of the time be safely translated as "with". However, in this context it means "at the same time (as the hens)". So you go to sleep at the same time as the hens or you wake up at the same time as the hens (that's the version I'm more familiar to, "Levantarse con las gallinas").


In English we sometimes employ the saying "The wife wears the pants (trousers) in that house" to signify that the the woman rules the roost. In Spanish the colloquial equivalent is "En casa de XYZ más puede la gallina que el gallo", which literally means "In XYZ's house the hen is more powerful than the rooster".

Thanks Chris! Here are some other related Spanish expressions that I know:

- "Ser un gallito", literally "To be a little rooster" can be translated as "To be cocky".

- "Estar como gallina en corral ajeno", literally "To be like a hen in somebody else's farmyard", can be translated as "To be like a fish out of water".

- "La gallina de los huevos de oro" is equivalent to "The goose that lays the golden eggs".

Want more? Don't hesitate to visit Colloquial Spanish blog!

Permalink

:: Next Page >>


Copyright JB Translations, 2006 //  Web site design by Wildfire Marketing Group